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Amy Poehler, Nick Offerman, Retta & More Talk ‘Galentine’s Day’ With Bustle

Amy Poehler, Nick Offerman, Retta & More Talk ‘Galentine’s Day’ With Bustle

In honor of the 10th anniversary of the Parks & Recreation series premiere on April 9, the cast and crew of the show talked to Bustle about one of the legacies of the show, “Galentine’s Day”. You can read the entire interview below!

Regardless of whether you like to spend Valentine’s Day on a romantic date or hanging at home solo, chances are that you spend the day before, Feb. 13, surrounded by friends. After all, while Galentine’s Day — the annual celebration of the bonds between women — isn’t an official U.S. holiday, it’s so ingrained in our culture that it might as well be. Every year around that time, businesses ranging from ASOS to Target feature Galentine’s Day sales, specials, and friendship-themed products, as countless women take to social media to profess their love for their BFFs. Yet while Galentine’s Day may be practically a part of the vernacular at this point, it’s easy to forget how it all began: not with some brand’s promotional campaign, but in a Season 2 Parks and Recreation episode all about — what else? — Leslie Knope’s love for her best female friends.

In the 2010 episode of the NBC sitcom, fittingly titled “Galentine’s Day,” Leslie (Amy Poehler) throws her annual party meant to honor the ladies in her life on the day before Valentine’s. It’s a sweet scene, but a seemingly throwaway one in a show full of similarly adorable moments — except that in the years since the episode, Galentine’s Day has taken on a life of its own. In honor of the 10th anniversary of the Parks & Rec series premiere on April 9, the cast and crew of “Galentine’s Day” tell Bustle how the now-iconic episode came to be — including those Leslie Knope-designed mosaic portraits.

SO WHO CAME UP WITH “GALENTINE’S DAY,” ANYWAY?

According to the episode’s creators, no one actually knows who created the idea for the holiday in the first place. Regardless, everyone was on-board with a day celebrating female friendship.

Mike Schur (co-creator and writer): I don’t know who came up with the original idea, or who was the first person to say it out loud, so I just credit the entire writing staff.

Amy Poehler (“Leslie Knope”): I feel like it was not me — I feel like I read it in the script. I have no memory of it… but [credit] is really not the point of it… I remember it being an early storyline about all of us women hanging out together, which wasn’t always the case on the show. So I just have fond memories of us getting to spend so much time together, which is great.

Amy Poehler talks ‘Wine Country’ in interview with Wine Spectator

Amy Poehler talks ‘Wine Country’ in interview with Wine Spectator

Amy Poehler recently talked with Wine Spectator about the inspiration for ‘Wine Country’, directing the movie and much more. Read the interview below!

For her feature directorial debut, Amy Poehler decided to head to Napa. The Saturday Night Live and Parks and Recreation star recruited an ensemble cast of her real-life friends who powered SNL‘s early-2000s renaissance—Maya Rudolph, Tina Fey, Rachel Dratch, Ana Gasteyer, Emily Spivey and Paula Pell—and loosely based the plot on a reunion trip they took to California wine country a few years ago to celebrate Dratch’s 50th birthday.

It may be a fictional comedy/drama, but Wine Country‘s backdrop is authentic Napa. Filming took place on location at Artesa Estate, Quintessa winery, Baldacci Family Vineyards and in the town of Calistoga. With the movie coming out on Netflix May 10, Poehler spoke with Wine Spectator associate editor Ben O’Donnell about the inspiration for the film, how to craft a wine joke, her ’90s adventures as a wine server at swanky Chicago restaurants, the perks (and buzzkills) of being in the director’s chair—and how to improv a wine review.

Wine Spectator: You wrote [in the book Yes Please] that wine was sort of in the house when you were growing up, and you associated it with being a grown-up. 
Amy Poehler: Yes! I grew up in Massachusetts in a tiny ranch house, and the dining room was always kind of cooler than the rest of the house, a little dusty, had your one set of fancy plates—and your wineglasses.

Wine Country: New Promotional and Behind The Scenes Images

Wine Country: New Promotional and Behind The Scenes Images

New images from Amy’s directorial debut ‘Wine Country’ have been released today, including a new promotional photoshoot, production stills and behind the scenes images! Click on the thumbnails below to check them out!

Maya Rudolph and Amy Poehler cover the April Digital Issue of Vanity Fair

Maya Rudolph and Amy Poehler cover the April Digital Issue of Vanity Fair

Maya Rudolph and Amy Poehler are on the cover of the April issue of Vanity Fair! In the interview, they talked about ‘Wine Country‘, SNL, their friendship and much more. Head over to our gallery to check out the beautiful cover shoot and read the full article below!

Maya Rudolph remembers the first time she met Amy Poehler. It was September 2001, and Poehler had just joined Saturday Night Live, where Rudolph was a cast member. “I walked into the writers’ room, and I feel like you were sitting on the table and everyone was just gathered around like, ‘Ahhhh, finally: Amy’s here,’ ” she says.

Poehler’s face twists in disgust. “What an asshole power move. Sitting on the table! I hope I was also urinating in all of the corners?”

The two women are nestled on a sofa in the cozy outbuilding of Poehler’s West Hollywood production company. The place feels like an eclectic museum—vintage flea-market paintings of naked women, Poehler’s Emmy statue, a snapshot of Hillary Clinton. The assortment of sanitary products and a breast-exam tutorial in the bathroom confirm this as a female space.

Sitting across from Rudolph and Poehler, I feel like I’m sunning myself in the glow of their mutual affection. They seem instinctively alert to every shift in the other’s emotional register, always ready with a gesture or word of encouragement. Whatever the opposite of resting bitch face is, that’s what Poehler has; she hovers in a constant state of twinkly amusement, mischievous but never mean. Rudolph is luminous; clad in a khaki-green shirt, pants, and coat, she has camouflaged herself to blend into the background.

Amy Poehler Photographed for the Los Angeles Times (PaleyFest Portraits)

Amy Poehler Photographed for the Los Angeles Times (PaleyFest Portraits)

Amy Poehler was photographed by the Los Angeles Times backstage at the PaleyFest last Thursday during the Parks and Recreation reunion. Our gallery has been updated with high quality photos from the portrait session. Click on the thumbnails below to check it out!