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Los Angeles Times Interview: Natasha Lyonne, Amy Poehler and Leslye Headland talk ‘Russian Doll’

Los Angeles Times Interview: Natasha Lyonne, Amy Poehler and Leslye Headland talk ‘Russian Doll’

Natasha Lyonne, Amy Poehler and Leslye Headland talked with the Los Angeles Times to discuss everything ‘Russian Doll‘. From where the idea started, to the development of the show and the positive ending. They also did a photoshoot together, which you can check out in our gallery. Read the full interview below!

On the sunny terrace of the 13th floor of the Netflix building in Hollywood, “Russian Doll” star Natasha Lyonne posed for pictures with creative partners Amy Poehler and Leslye Headland far from the lower Manhattan environs of their stuck-in-a-time-loop breakout show. The eight-episode comedy casts Lyonne as wisecracking New York City video game software designer Nadia Vulvokov, forced to die and re-live the night of her birthday party over and over until she solves the mysteries of her existence.

Profane, brusque, witty and occasionally mournful, Lyonne’s Nadia tangles with sardonic friends, confused lovers and Lower East Side street life in a scrappy quest that met near-unanimous acclaim upon its streaming debut in February.

Fresh off her Emmy-nominated performance in “Orange Is the New Black,” Lyonne created “Russian Doll” with Poehler of “Parks and Recreation” fame and writer-director Headland, who bonded with the actress during the making of their 2016 sex comedy “Sleeping With Other People.” Setting aside their iced coffees, Lyonne, Poehler and Headland settled into a cafeteria banquette and pulled apart the multilayered “Russian Doll” origins story.

Amy Poehler and Maya Rudolph cover the May issue of Parade Magazine

Amy Poehler and Maya Rudolph cover the May issue of Parade Magazine

Amy and Maya are gracing the cover of the May issue of Parade magazine, where they talked about ‘Wine Country‘. Check out pictures in our gallery, watch a behind the scenes videos and read the full interview below!

It’s hard enough to plan a weekend getaway with friends—and even harder when those friends are moms. That’s why longtime pals Amy Poehler and Maya Rudolph have only been on two trips together.

One was a jaunt to Palm Springs, California, where Rudolph was bitten by a black widow spider and EMTs needed to be called. The other was a gals’ getaway to wine country in California’s Napa Valley that Poehler, Rudolph and a few other fellow female Saturday Night Livealums took for Rachel Dratch’s 50th birthday three years ago.

And the minute they all got on the plane together, “it was simply right back where we left it, the last time we were together,” says Rudolph, 46. By the end of their trip, they’d had so many laughs, running jokes and robust conversations, they started bouncing around the idea of making a movie about it. The result: this month’s new Netflix film Wine Country (in select theaters May 8; streaming May 10), directed by Poehler, 47.

Amy Poehler covers The Hollywood Reporter Magazine

Amy Poehler covers The Hollywood Reporter Magazine

Amy is on the cover of the April 24 issue of The Hollywood Reporter. In the interview, she talked about Wine Country, feminism, and much more. Our gallery has been updated with photos from the photoshoot and the magazine cover. The full article can be found below and there’s also a video with an interview and behind the scenes images that you can watch!

“I’ve been trying to unpack my own deep institutionalized misogyny,” says Amy Poehler. “Our generation of women, Gen Xer women, we desexualized ourselves. And that stuff gets really ingrained. I grew up in a time where trying to sympathize or empathize with the male experience was how I was able to be included in the experience.”

We are having lunch at a farm-to-table cafe in the Park Slope neighborhood of Brooklyn, where Poehler, 47, owns a wine shop. She is dressed in dark jeans and a chambray shirt, the top button securely fastened at her neck. “You’re So Vain,” Carly Simon’s ballad to male narcissism, is playing — a little too loudly — over the restaurant speakers.

Like so many women of her generation, Poehler is grappling with her own pre-#MeToo assumptions about sexual politics amid the existential dread of the Trump era. But one thing is certain: She has definitely had it with condescension from the patriarchy. “Women are constantly criticized for being too emotional,” she tells me. “Can we be allowed to be as messy, as all over the place, as inconsistent and as mediocre as men? Do we have to always be patient, special, nurturing, adaptable?”

Amy Poehler photographed for Deadline

Amy Poehler photographed for Deadline

During Deadline’s Contenders Emmy Event, Amy was photographed for Deadline to promote Broad City and Russian Doll. She was photographed alongside Natasha Lyonne, Leslye Headland and Abbi Jacobson. Head over to our gallery to see the photos!

Maya Rudolph and Amy Poehler cover the April Digital Issue of Vanity Fair

Maya Rudolph and Amy Poehler cover the April Digital Issue of Vanity Fair

Maya Rudolph and Amy Poehler are on the cover of the April issue of Vanity Fair! In the interview, they talked about ‘Wine Country‘, SNL, their friendship and much more. Head over to our gallery to check out the beautiful cover shoot and read the full article below!

Maya Rudolph remembers the first time she met Amy Poehler. It was September 2001, and Poehler had just joined Saturday Night Live, where Rudolph was a cast member. “I walked into the writers’ room, and I feel like you were sitting on the table and everyone was just gathered around like, ‘Ahhhh, finally: Amy’s here,’ ” she says.

Poehler’s face twists in disgust. “What an asshole power move. Sitting on the table! I hope I was also urinating in all of the corners?”

The two women are nestled on a sofa in the cozy outbuilding of Poehler’s West Hollywood production company. The place feels like an eclectic museum—vintage flea-market paintings of naked women, Poehler’s Emmy statue, a snapshot of Hillary Clinton. The assortment of sanitary products and a breast-exam tutorial in the bathroom confirm this as a female space.

Sitting across from Rudolph and Poehler, I feel like I’m sunning myself in the glow of their mutual affection. They seem instinctively alert to every shift in the other’s emotional register, always ready with a gesture or word of encouragement. Whatever the opposite of resting bitch face is, that’s what Poehler has; she hovers in a constant state of twinkly amusement, mischievous but never mean. Rudolph is luminous; clad in a khaki-green shirt, pants, and coat, she has camouflaged herself to blend into the background.